Category Archives: Showroom

my work

Customer Insight Dashboard for debt collectors

In today’s economy your collectors need the best customer insights they can get. That means giving them the the right information at the right time in the right format. Forget working off of mainframe green screens, or bolted on front-ends–those tools aren’t made to provide maximum insights to your collectors.

Your collectors need a Customer Insight Dashboard like the one below*. The dashboard shows, in detail, information that your collectors need to maximize their debt collection efforts. Across the top of the dashboard is the customer’s financial trend information and pertinent scores about their risk level and ability to pay you back. Along the left-hand side of the dashboard we provide your collectors with the ability to listen to prior interactions with the customer as well as access information they might use to locate a customer who is avoiding your calls. In addition, your staff could locate customer’s nearby your target customer for aid in tracking them down.

Dashboard

Click image for high resolution version

On the bottom left-hand side of the dashboard your collectors have access to the customer’s most recent credit bureau data. This is a critical component to making sure you get paid first. We’ve parsed the information from the credit bureau to show your collectors which of your customer’s credit card lines they could use to balance transfer their bad debt off of your books and onto your competitors books.

If a picture’s worth a thousand words, an image of the customer’s house or business might be worth $10,000. We find this information very useful to collectors in helping them figure out what makes each customer tick. Your collectors can then use their skills of persuasion and apply the information to help them collect the debt that’s due to you.

Lastly, we show some recent transactions on the customer’s account. Seeing how they spent the money they owe you can also help your collectors be more persuasive in the collections efforts.

A dashboard like the one above could be implemented in your system in a few weeks. The dashboard itself is all done in Excel 2003 (2007 works too) with a $250 add in.

*The data presented in this dashboard are not real. They are provided for illustrated purposes only.

Americans love their beer and wine, but we’re drinking less beer than before. See the big picture now.

Here are two interactive visualizations I put together showing beverage consumption, in gallons, from 1985 through 2007. The data are from the US Department of Agriculture.

There are a host of interesting things in the data. From 1985 through 2007 the biggest changes are:

–A sextupling in consumption of bottled water
–A 50% increase in diet soda consumption
–A 60% decrease in whole milk consumption
–A doubling in skim milk consumption

It’s interesting to see how beer consumption hovered around 24 gallons per person per year from 1985 through 1990 and then dropped off and leveled out at 21.7 gallons per person from 1995 through 2007. That’s an 11% decrease. Wine consumption, on the other hand, has had a roller coaster ride the over the last 12 years. In 1985 we were consuming about 2.4 gallons per person of wine per year. Then wine consumption bottomed out from 1993-1995 to 1.7 gallons per person. Since 1996, however, wine consumption has increased just about every year and now stands at 2.5 gallons per year, per person.


For this visualization, I thought I’d give Many Eyes a go and visualize some data using their stacked area chart and treemap visualization. The process of uploading the data to their site was a snap, and the visualizations were quite easy to do as well. In addition, embedding the visualizations on my site was a piece of cake, just copy and paste the code that they provide on their site and you’re done.

One thing they could do to enhance learning from their graphs is to enable linking of two chart types. For example, I’d love to be able to be able to select a cell in the treemap and see the corresponding area in the stacked area chart get highlighted.

Also, here’s a link to a good story in Slate about milk’s recent image problems in the U.S.

Education Pays, get the facts in this informative graph

 

Education Pays!


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Fact: High school dropouts are three times more likely to be jobless than college graduates.

Fact: People with some college make 50% more than high school dropouts.

Fact: A college graduate earns almost twice as much as a high school graduate.

It pays to get schooled

It pays to get schooled


Click here to download this post as a pdf.

The Best Insights into U.S. unemployment, revealed in this Dashboard

At precisely 8:30am, on the first Friday of each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases its Employment Situation report, the most anticipated report for stock, bond, and currency traders in the world. The report is analyzed by a wide variety of sources like CNN, WSJ, Bloomberg, NYTimes, Economy.com, AP, and MSNBC.

The Economic Situation report is critical because it covers the single most important factor in the world’s economy, employment in the U.S. Put simply, if U.S. consumers are losing their jobs, spending will decrease. And since household spending accounts for more than two-thirds of the U.S.’s economy, any change in spending will have an impact on the rest of the world’s economy.

The Economic Situation report is important for another reason. According to Bernard Baumohl, author of the book, The Secrets of Economic Indicators, “Experts have a difficult time trying to predict the unemployment figures because so little other information is out yet for that month.”

With so much riding on this one report, the Business Intelligence Guru thought it the perfect area to apply his information visualization and analytical skills. After all, the data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics are pretty lifeless–just a bunch of numbers in twenty different data tables. Trying to identify trends in such raw form data is difficult and time consuming. When high quality info viz is properly applied to such data, however, the fog lifts and insights come shining through.

The BLS tables contain different looks at employment and unemployment like:

  • Employment status by sex and age
  • Employment status by race, sex, and age
  • Employment status by education level
  • Unemployment by reason for unemployment
  • Unemployment by duration of unemployment
  • Average weekly hours of work
  • Average earnings (hourly/weekly) by type of industry
  • Monthly changes in employment

The challenge and opportunity here is to provide a clear, consolidated, and insightful view of related and relevant data from the BLS. The Economic Situation report for July 2009 contains nearly 1,000 words. The data tables in the report add approximately 300 data points to the document. But neither the text nor web version of the report on BLS’ website contain a single graph. It doesn’t take a Business Intelligence Guru to know that this is a ripe opportunity for a well-designed dashboard to shed light on. And so, The Business Intelligence Guru presents you with the “Insights into Unemployment in the United States” dashboard for July 2009.

The Busines Intelligence Guru's Dashboard of U.S. Unemployment

The Business Intelligence Guru's Dashboard of U.S. Unemployment

I intend to update this dashboard the first Friday of each month, shortly after the BLS releases the report, so check back then for timely updates.

Lastly, I’m always on the lookout for ways to improve my work, so feel free to leave suggestions and criticism.

Thanks.

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The Best Insights into U.S. unemployment, revealed in this Award Winning Dashboard

At precisely 8:30am, on the first Friday of each month, the Bureau of Labor Statistics releases its Employment Situation report, the most anticipated report for stock, bond, and currency traders in the world. The report is analyzed by a wide variety of sources like CNN, WSJ, Bloomberg, NYTimes, Economy.com, AP, and MSNBC.

The Economic Situation report is critical because it covers the single most important factor in the world’s economy, employment in the U.S. Put simply, if U.S. consumers are losing their jobs, spending will decrease. And since household spending accounts for more than two-thirds of the U.S.’s economy, any change in spending will have an impact on the rest of the world’s economy.

The Economic Situation report is important for another reason. According to Bernard Baumohl, author of the book, The Secrets of Economic Indicators, “Experts have a difficult time trying to predict the unemployment figures because so little other information is out yet for that month.”

With so much riding on this one report, the Business Intelligence Guru thought it the perfect area to apply his information visualization and analytical skills. After all, the data released by the Bureau of Labor Statistics are pretty lifeless–just a bunch of numbers in twenty different data tables. Trying to identify trends in such raw form data is difficult and time consuming. When high quality info viz is properly applied to such data, however, the fog lifts and insights come shining through.

The BLS tables contain different looks at employment and unemployment like:

  • Employment status by sex and age
  • Employment status by race, sex, and age
  • Employment status by education level
  • Unemployment by reason for unemployment
  • Unemployment by duration of unemployment
  • Average weekly hours of work
  • Average earnings (hourly/weekly) by type of industry
  • Monthly changes in employment

The challenge and opportunity here is to provide a clear, consolidated, and insightful view of related and relevant data from the BLS. The Economic Situation report for July 2009 contains nearly 1,000 words. The data tables in the report add approximately 300 data points to the document. But neither the text nor web version of the report on BLS’ website contain a single graph. It doesn’t take a Business Intelligence Guru to know that this is a ripe opportunity for a well-designed dashboard to shed light on. And so, The Business Intelligence Guru presents you with the “Insights into Unemployment in the United States” dashboard for July 2009.

Clicking the image of the dashboard (below) will get you a high-resolution version of it.

Dashboard of U.S. Unemployment

Dashboard of U.S. Unemployment

Lastly, I’m always on the lookout for ways to improve my work, so feel free to leave suggestions and criticism.

Thanks.

–John

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